The Effect Of Cables On Knitting

I am still on a Woodland Hoodlet kick.  The version for 12 inch fashion dolls is still in progress, but I decided to cast on a new one that will fit 10-12" dolls (like Tonner Patsy, and my Bambicrony Lottie) and 16" fashion dolls (like Tonner's Sydney).

With this latest version I decided to take some pictures of the beginning.  I find it very interesting how the fabric of knitting is impacted by the pattern/stitches.  Cables especially have a huge impact.  They provide a lot of texture and visual interest, but they also affect the size.  When you're talking about huge cables, such as the twelve stitch ones in the Woodland Hoodlet pattern, you really see the impact.

The first picture is with the setup rows only completed.  It's three rows of basic stockinette, then two rows introducing the knit and purl pattern that sets up the cables.

I laid the fabric down without stretching, and we have seven inches in length (or in the case of this pattern, "height", since we are knitting the front section back and forth.)  If I were to knit this without adding cables, this would be way too big for my target doll, and sloppy on top of it.

Size 2 US needles with Loops & Thread Woolike yarn held single.  There are only knit and purl stitches so far.

Size 2 US needles with Loops & Thread Woolike yarn held single.  There are only knit and purl stitches so far.

Next we have the project with the first four row repeat completed.  The pattern uses short rows, so we are just beginning to start the shaping so that the neckline/top will be narrower across than the hemline/bottom.  We have also introduced the cables and bobbles.

We have introduced two sets of twelve stitch cables, plus a six stitch cable at the beginning of the four row repeat, and a four stitch cable at the end of the four row repeat.  Otherwise all stitches are basic knit and purl.

Adding these cables has shrunk the fabric from seven inches down to four inches.  We have lost three inches of fabric!

This is pretty dramatic just in a doll scaled knit.  When I knit the adult medium, the impact of the cables was even more so.

After the first four row pattern repeat.  Several cables have been added, shrinking the fabric dramatically.

After the first four row pattern repeat.  Several cables have been added, shrinking the fabric dramatically.

I tend not to knit test swatches for my doll knits, since I figure whatever I end up with will fit at least one of the dolls in my collection.  But if I ever decide to knit an adult sweater, especially one with cables, I will definitely take that extra time.  I will even knit two versions, one with basic stockinette, and one with the cable pattern.  Unlike my dolls, I wouldn't feel too happy about having to hand off a sweater I put in hours/weeks/months into and have it not fit my intended recipient!  :D

Woodland Hoodlet On Bambicrony Lottie

Here are some quick pictures of the 10-12" sized Woodland Hoodlet modeled on my Bambicrony Lottie sculpt, Sofia.  She is a 10 inch tall doll, similar in size to Tonner's Patsy and Ann Estelle.  However, her shoulders and overall build is slimmer than the Tonner dolls.

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Smaller Yet! Knitted Woodland Hoodlet For 12" Fashion Dolls

This may be the smallest version of the fantastic Woodland Hoodlet pattern by Tiny Owl Knits that I attempt.  This is turning out right on target for 12" fashion dolls, at least judging by how the finished front  section looks held up against my Fashion Royalty Poppy Parker (The Bratter Lover's) doll.

I am knitting with lace weight extra fine merino yarn held double on size 0 US needles.  I purchased the yarn from my favorite yarn seller, Penelope's Fine Yarns on Etsy.  The yarn is a light yellow with a hint of gold, and is named "Buckskin-Straw Into Gold."  There's still a skein of it available at the time of this post.

This size has been more frustrating for me, especially when I hit the twelve stitch cables and the bobbles.  I have dropped more stitches on this version than the other three I have made combined.  Part of my problem is when I knit with yarn held double I can get mixed up on where my stitches really are, especially on tiny needles.  The other complication is just the small scale, period.  Now that I am done with the heavily cabled/bobbled front section, the rest should be much more relaxing, though.

For now, here are some pictures of the work in progress.

The finished front section held up against my 12" Fashion Royalty Poppy Parker doll.

The finished front section held up against my 12" Fashion Royalty Poppy Parker doll.

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Even Smaller!-Knitted Woodland Hoodlet For 10-12" Dolls Nearly Finished

Even with smaller needles, this is still a relatively quick and easy knit.  I finished the front and back sections last night, and did the Kitchener stitch seam.  I already picked up the stitches around the neckline for the hood, and am a couple of cable repeats into it.  

For this smaller size I only did nine cabled repeats on the back.  When I do a second one in this size I will try it with ten repeats and see how it looks.  But for now this gives a good fit on a wide range of dolls, at least sans the hood.  I did a quick test fit on my 16" Tonner Sydney doll out of curiosity, and it was a good fit.  I think if I had ten repeats, that extra half inch or so would make it too slouchy, but we will see on the next one.

I am pretty sure this one will be completed this evening! I have several dolls I can try this size on, so it will give a much better idea of scale and fit.  :)

The front and back completed, and seam done.  

The front and back completed, and seam done.  

The back.

The back.

The beginning of the hood.  You do need to be careful when you pick up the stitches so you distribute them evenly around the neckline.  You pretty much are skipping 2-3 stitches between picked up stitches.  If you picked up every stitch around, the hood would be huge!

The beginning of the hood.  You do need to be careful when you pick up the stitches so you distribute them evenly around the neckline.  You pretty much are skipping 2-3 stitches between picked up stitches.  If you picked up every stitch around, the hood would be huge!